Direct Aid to People in Haiti

UAF Reaches Jeremie and the Mountain Paths

The United Aid Foundation team of volunteers hit the Haitian dirt running over the weekend.

First heading to Jeremie, the coastal community hardest hit by Hurricane Matthew.

“If you ever want to peak into the gates of hell, the city of Jeremie is the place to begin,” said Mike Wnek, a UAF board member and the leader of our project in Haiti.

“Entire stretches of coastline were obliterated.”

Jeremie, Haiti

Jeremie, Haiti

Wnek and his crew delivered food and water to families in need in Jeremie, but noted there is a lot of international aid pouring into the traditional tourist area. So he and the team headed up into the mountain areas to help those who hadn’t been reached yet.

“So many people had their roofs blown off, losing virtually all of the few possessions they had,” Wnek noticed.

Most Haitians are scrambling to find food and clean water. Many haven’t eaten in nearly a week. Children are suffering. Cholera, due to water contamination is a constant worry.

Hospitals are full of the injured and sick. Many of those killed by Matthew had to be buried quickly in mass graves.

An extended family welcomes aid after losing their home

An extended family welcomes aid after losing their home

Yet despite circumstances that seem bleak, Wnek said the Haitian people are helping each other and doing their best to recover.

UAF volunteer Cenovio Villa delivers food to a woman taking care of 14 family members

UAF volunteer Cenovio Villa delivers food to a woman taking care of 14 family members

 

“Even though the damage was phenomenal, the spirit and resilience of the Haitians is amazing,” Wnek said. They are already cleaning up, opening the small roadside stands, music is playing in some areas.”

 

The UAF team delivered more than 8-thousand pounds of rice, 2-thousand pounds of beans, cooking oil and water. The response was smiles, handshakes, gratitude and prayers.

Mike Wnek with hurricane survivor Ramone Francois, 90-years old.

Mike Wnek with hurricane survivor Ramone Francois, 90-years old.

That’s what keeps volunteers going ¬†as they travel the difficult roads of Haiti.

 

 

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